IoT Privacy Forum founder Gilad Rosner features in the latest episode of O’Reilly’s Hardware Podcast, discussing his research for the British government, and the differences between European and US privacy cultures.

On his work used by the UK Parliament (paraphrased in parts):

That research was when the UK government put out a call and said, we’d like to vacuum up a lot of social media data and analyze it for government purposes: “beneficial outcomes” rather than law enforcement. Trying to look at data and come up with new information that would theoretically be beneficial to society. They were wondering how they’d go about it — whether “public” social media posts could present ethical problems when inhaling all that data for analysis. The answer is: yes, there are ethical problems here, because even though information is set to “public”, there’s a concept of respecting the context in which the data was uploaded, or volunteered. When I tweet, I’m not necessarily expecting the government to mine that information about me.

When it comes to privacy and data protection, especially with a large actor like the government, one of the most important concerns is procedural safeguards. Governments have ideas all the time, often good ideas, but the apparatus of implementing these ideas is very large, bureaucratic, and diffuse. So what constrains these activities, to make sure they’re being done securely, in line with existing privacy regulations, and with people being sensitive to things not necessarily covered by regulation, but still potentially worrisome? How do we come up with ways of letting good ideas happen, but under control?